It is currently Sat Dec 15, 2018 7:00 am



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
 Preperations 
Author Message
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 6:55 am
Posts: 3373
Location: 30 clicks N of 3030
 Re: Preperations
Ok Lynnwood and GTA - you're on!

I do declare - it is the most satisfying experience to eat from your own gardening efforts. My sweet wife is ceo of the Victory Garden here on Trinity Farm and she is a real gem at growing things. Me? I am the jack of trades. I make stuff to get the operations working at the level of success we plan together.

Lynnwwod - if you are serious about being healthy and keen to eat well, then this project is a real dandy! And to answer your question: No it is not hard at all. It just requires dedication and vision. More later...

Ok - off to the new Gardening section GTA so kindly supplied. Thanks dude. Learning and teaching each other things has to be the next satisfying thing we can all expereince.

I am keen also to hear of any successes and problem folks experience - so bring it on!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

_________________
We all have the choice to exercise Free Will.
Omnia Vincit Veritas
"Ignis natura Renovatur Integram"


Tue Oct 20, 2009 11:36 am
Profile
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
The trouble with so-called survivalist recipes is that the writers seem to think that after a shipwreck when people are huddling together in a cave they’ll have access to all sorts of exotic ingredients. Half of the stuff I can’t even find in supermarkets. (1)

Quote:
1. Boil red lentils up and add tomato paste and black pepper. Quite good.

2. Boiled rice with reconstituted powdered milk and sugar. Tastes good and is filling.

3. Instant mashed potato with green peas mixed in. A little gravy with it is excellent.

4. A box of long life custard with a can of peaches. This is a great meal and will last you all day.

5. Boil up some short grained rice in a saucepan and add cocoa and sugar. You can keep this on the boil for days and you just dip into it when you’re hungry. This is an old favourite of bushmen.

6. Johnny cakes. These are self raising flour mixed with powdered milk and fried with a little margarine. If you like you can add peas corn etc to the dough. Tastes great.

7. Boil up some rice. Pour a small tin of flavoured tuna over the rice. Very good.

8. Fill a cup up one third with powdered milk. Add 4 teaspoons of Milo and three teaspoons of sugar. Fill the cup with boiling water and stir. One cup of this will keep you going for most of the day.

9. Tin of baked beans. Just eat them out of the tin. Add a little Worsteshire sauce to taste.

10. Half a cabbage boiled in a can of tomato juice and a little margarine. Tastes really good. Tomato juice can also be used to boil up all kinds of edible weeds and leaves. All taste good. You can add a little salt and garlic to taste.

11. Boil up some pasta and top it with a can of tomatoes and oil that has been boiled until most of the water has been removed. Top it with cheese. If you really want to be posh fry up a little onion with the tomatoes. I lived off this for a couple of years once and never got sick of it. You can add things too as they become available, like garlic, olives etc etc.

12. Potato powder. This is an incredible good survival food. If you don’t have much of it just mix a couple of tea spoons in a cup of hot water and drink it. Tastes good.

13. A feel good food. Make up a cup of tea with a teabag, but not very strong. Add milk and sugar to taste. Drink it while eating a packet of raisins. It will lift your spirits on a cold windy day like nothing else. I used to eat this when I was welding pipelines in the cold windy mountains and the desert and it will keep you going for hours.

14. Always keep a pot of soup boiling at camp if you can. Just keep adding anything you like to it and keep it going for months. Anyone can help themselves anytime they feel like it.

15. Potato cakes. Self raising flour and potato powder with a little milk and fried in margarine. Very nice.

16. A tin of Christmas pudding, heated with a tin of cream or long life custard. Great treat.

17. A tin of spicy tomato soup boiled until it is a paste. Pour over pasta with a little cheese. Add a little margarine to the pasta.

18. Hard tack biscuits. These are terrible but might keep you alive. Get plain flour and mix with water until there is a good pliable dough. Roll out until about half an inch thick and bake in oven until hard. Don’t add anything else. To eat soak them in water. Will keep for decades if kept dry.

19. Make your own soup mix. Just get a plastic ziplock bag and add dried carrots, dried peas, corn, potato etc etc. When you want to make soup just throw a handful into boiling water. Vegetable or beef powder is a great additive. You can also add any fish you happen to have caught, shellfish, rabbits etc etc.

Okay. That’s enough of gourmet hour on Aussurv for now.

Getting food in the city.

$10 will buy you a big bag of groceries if you shop wisely. Factory seconds stores sell food very cheaply, as does Aldi, and even Woolworths has specials that sometimes match these two. This week I found packets if biscuits in Woolworths for 25 cents, and last week 1 kilo bags of tropical muesli in Factory seconds for 35 cents. A bag of muesli with some powdered milk can keep you going for a week! Here is a week’s grocery bill I’ve put together from actual prices.

1 kg bag of muesli 35 cents

½ kilo sugar 45 cents

½ kilo powdered milk $1.20

5 tins soup $2.50

1 kilo rice 50 cents

2 tins fish $1

A grand total of $6 for a week’s food. You’ll be hungry but this money can keep you alive quite easily for each week.

If you ask in the green grocers for some off-cuts and leaves for your rabbits you will be a very well fed survivalist indeed.



(1)
http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum ... 968964/pg2

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:16 am
Profile WWW
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
Survivalism seems to have different definitions to many members here. Some see themselves as setting up homesteads, others see themselves as squatting in urban or wilderness environments etc., but what follows are recommendations that concern pure survivalism, ie., you are mobile and anything can happen.

What to stockpile? (1)

Quote:
If you intend to set up a homestead your imagination can be the limit. But if you need to remain mobile this somewhat lessens your options. There also seems to be an assumption through much survivalist literature that overfed western people can suddenly go on a third world or survival diet and there won’t be too many repercussions to health. I would assume that this isn’t correct. In all probability the average westerner will last a week or two in misery before serious heath concerns become apparent. For these reasons the survivalist should copy as closely as possible the diet that they have already become accustomed to.

Our diets contain a lot of sugar. Without it our diets will seem bland and we will lack energy. Many people are also diabetic and don’t know it and sugar is the only cure if they become unconscious through lack of it. Nearly all products sold in supermarkets are crammed with sugar - if it tastes okay, it will have lots of sugar in it.

Fibre is also necessary as well as large amounts of protein.

My guess as to what will occur when suddenly put on a survival diet on stockpiled food is after about a week, general weakness and constipation, that tends to get worse over a period of weeks, followed by general weakness and a disinterest in doing anything.

1. About 3 months supply of food per person. This must be reasonably compact and light. No more than 100 kgs. Dried food is really the only option.

Rice - and you might as well spend a bit more and get the stuff you like.

Powdered milk (full cream)

Sugar

Dried green peas and beans

Dried carrots

A few kilos of home dried vegetables

Beans

chocolate

Chocolate

Chocolates

More chocolates

Jelly beans - at least 1 kilo per person per month.

Coca cola

Tins of meat

Oil - the most essential food item of all. Any gathered food can be cooked in it. If you don’t have enough oil you will die pretty quickly.

Bags of candy

Tins of fish

Tins of meat. You can’t have too much. Tins of meat will also be great trading items.

Vitamin capsules.

Packets of crisp bread.

If you want a short list of the things you’ll really need.

1. Rice

2. Tins of fish and meat.

3. Dried vegetables. Dry them yourself at home and store them in zip lock bags.

4. Bottles of oil.

5. Lots of sugar.

6. Lots of powdered milk. (full cream for short term and low fat for long term storage.)

7. pasta.

7. Weet Bix.

8. Vitamin capsules.

9. Vitamin C powder.

Throw in a couple of large jars of Vegemite, some peanut butter and some candy and you’ll be a very well fed survivalist.

Greens can be had by foraging for edible weeds.

Just about anything you catch hunt or grow can be added to the above to make many different kinds of meals.

Why not wheat?

The only advantage of wheat is that it can be kept for long periods. But other than that it is bulky, expensive, requires special packaging and takes processing, and in most situations it is going to taste very bland. A kilo of wheat will cost 50 cents and a kilo of processed food made from wheat won’t cost much more. A lot of people also, can’t eat wheat - you’ve just got to check to see you’re not one of them. Eat some every day for three weeks, say main meal per day, and see how you feel.

Things I avoid buying.

Instant potato powder - this stuff tastes good but is too expensive. It was developed during WWI and fed to the troops in Europe but only because it could be transported and could keep for a while. But potatoes lose quite a bit of food value when processed in this way.

Tinned food from Asia (with the Chinese writing on them found in Asian food sections of supermarkets.) Some of these tins are dangerous. I just opened a tin of prawns that I bought for an experiment. They had a brown colour and a foul smell. I wasn’t game to taste them. If you bought 100 tins all would have to be thrown out.

Meat sauces ie., Leggos, Campbells, savoury mince etc. You will only be buying taste here. They are inferior products made to taste okay with spices. Much better are tins of meat such as Plumrose, Hormels etc. At least you know what you are getting here.

As much as possible avoid tins with ring pull tabs. These are not safe. If a can is dropped, or if it has weight stacked on top of it, or if it is treated roughly as might be the case in a survival situation, these seals can allow air into the can with deadly consequences. Buy only cans that need a can opener to open.

There are many other products, especially in cans, that might not be what they claim. Usually the concern will be how much water has been added. I’ve bought tins of baked beans where at least half the can was excess water. I’ve bought tins of fruit that were at least 40% excess water. You have to pick and choose brands before stockpiling. Don’t just buy one can. Buy six cans over a period of weeks to check that the quality is consistent and that you like the product. There are laws in Australia that say food manufacturers can’t sell you anything that will make you sick, but apart from this it is a free-for-all.

Never buy a can that is dented or damaged in any way.

Survival foods - many of these are good quality food, just more expensive because of the extra processing and packaging. Foil pouches are okay


(1)
http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum ... 968964/pg2

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:25 am
Profile WWW
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
What are some very cheap meals for this week’s gourmet hour? (1)

Quote:
Get a packet of cheesy macaroni from Adli. (86 cents) Cook as per directions and add a tin of No-Name mussels from Woolworths (88 cents on special.) Tastes great and is a very serious calorie hit. Probably more than most could eat. $1.74 in total. These items will also store for a long time.

A tin of tomatoes from Aldi (45 cents.) I boiled them up mixed with a quarter cabbage from a dumpster and a little margarine (80 cents per large tub from Woolworths) Very nice. Total costs about 48 cents for two.

I got a sack of cauliflower pieces and carrot ends from *** at Wetherill Park in Sydney by walking around the back and helping myself to the waste bin. I boiled these in No Name tomato juice about $1 per large can from Coles with little margarine, garlic and a little sugar.. Cost per meal is under 40 cents. Tasted very good.

3 kilo bag of sugar from Coles. I made some toffee with this. Good for after dinner sweets!

Valcom tuna I found in Coles (discontinued line) I bought for 99 cents per tin - a big saving. I simply boiled some rice and poured this over it. Total cost of meal (about $1.30) and very nice. Had some rice over which I ate with milk and sugar for breakfast the next day. Cost (about 20 cents).

When you go into any supermarket you have to keep your eyes open. The quoted prices are nonsense. Who’d buy a ready to eat meal for $6 ??? We are not all millionaires. $6 is a lot of money. You are eating money faster than you can make it. You can feed yourself for a week on $6 without trying too hard. In the wilderness you should be able to feed yourself for ten cents per meal. Eg., you only need to supply the rice and a little oil and you add to this the fish you catch.

The same goes in a city. But in a city you are mainly limited to a vegetarian diet because meat is too dangerous or unpalatable to scrounge. If you go to Go Lo or Aldi, or even Woolworths you can buy pasta very cheaply, under 50 cents per packet. You will also need some oil and maybe a few spices. Then you scrounge around for something to put on it. Vegetables are usually going for the asking, or taking, and occasionally meat or fish are going very cheaply.

Tins of sardines for 25 cents per can is one option but I don’t like them that much. You add these to a packet of noodles like a Chinese guy showed me once and it tastes pretty damned good, and it is a nutritious meal.

If you really want to get stingy watch the Chinese new arrival types in supermarkets. Follow them around and see what they buy. I once did this and he bought a whole trolley load of No-Name noodles. I know what you’re thinking, did I go up and hit him? No. I ran into him down at the green grocers and he was haggling for a bag of vegetable offcuts, and at the butchers he asked for a bag of meat for his dog. I estimate his food expenses for a month would have been about $20. It’s not the sort of diet I would like but with a few alterations I could get that system to work for me, and you can get it to work for you too.

Study the way that food is distributed in big cities like Sydney. It is a deeply fascinating subject. It is especially interesting to realise that food is produced one day and eaten the next and the whole cycle just continues. The food you buy in supermarkets has come from incredibly diverse sources. .

Tip for today: In any industrial area where there is a food processor, food will be in dumpster bins.

Okay, let’s look at free food. This was Friday.

I went to work. In the refrigerator there was a tub of macaroni from last week’s barbecue only to be thrown out. Scoffed it down. Lunchtime. Company barbecue. Went back for seconds and thirds and drank lots of free orange juice. Watched a Chinese fellow placing pieces of chicken and pizza slices in bag. I did the same. After work I went to supermarket. Had free samples from sample lady. Tasted a few of the nuts at nut counter before deciding they were not for me. Went to back of complex to look for dumpster. Lots of eggs. Potentially dangerous so left them there. Drove out to industrial complex. Got a bag full of vegetable offcuts from dumpster. Also got a sack of pasta, but on further inspection it seemed damp and left it there. Lots of apples in bin. Took some of these.

Got some free refills at Hungry Jacks. And went home a very well fed survivalist. On Saturday morning I had a cook up.

Tip: Ride your push bike along motorways. You’ll see lots of stuff that motorists have thrown out and stuff that’s fallen off the backs of trucks. I’ve found lots of good things like this. I’ve found tools, tins of food, boxes of vegetables and lots of sunglasses.

Potential sources of food I’ve tried by accident.

Convention centres. Lots of food lying around and lots of it isn’t eaten. Put your suit on and walk around. Jars of orange juice everywhere.

Street markets at closing time. Lots of stalls with fast food that hasn’t been sold and will only been thrown out. You can buy lots of food cheaply, but it will often have to be eaten quickly. Good if you have to feed twenty people.

Picture theatres. Lots of cups of jaffas, peanuts, etc left on seats. The bins in the foyers also have lots of half packets. Don’t make it look obvious as to what you are doing as the management won’t want scroungers hanging around.

Anywhere there are caterers. Caterers are often trendy, alternate lifestyle types, and like nothing better than to serve up a free meal to you if you look poor and deserving. You usually won’t even have to ask, just hang around and look hungry.


(1)
http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum ... 968964/pg2

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:27 am
Profile WWW
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
Further sources of food.
(1)
Quote:
In western countries we rely on about ten plant species for most of our energy needs. And nearly all of our diet relies on about thirty plants. We are so conditioned culturally that we generally ignore the many thousands of other plants that haven’t come into our culture. The general attitude is that these other plants are not ‘real food.’

Even today many regard such foods as tofu, one of the major foods of the world, not ‘real’ food. A hundred years ago Australians regarded pasta and sour kraut, not to be real food. A hundred years before this many of Australia’s first settlers didn’t regard the fish caught in Sydney Harbour to be real food, and many regarded starvation as preferable. There are also stories from Ireland that during the potato famine a lot of people refused to eat cattle feed. The situation was the same in some parts of the Soviet Union during the famines of the 30’s.

Ask anyone nowadays how much edible food grows in the Australian wilderness and most would answer that the amount is negligible. They answer this way because of the way they have been conditioned. While they enjoy such things as prawns they will turn their noses up at witchetty grubs - what makes one delicious and the other repugnant is just culture and habit.

The amount of food growing wild in Australia is in fact much greater than many suppose, and in many areas it would be difficult to starve if one has the knowledge of what plants are food. There is sufficient species of plants in fact, growing along Sydney’s drainage canals, to support life, quite easily. Some of these plants are native and many are exotic. Eg., Bullrush is prolific along and in drainage canals and the roots can eaten. This plant made up part of the Aboriginal diet. And though not very tasty it will certainly supply a lot of carbohydrates. Some of the exotic plants include common weeds such as dandelion and blackberries.

Other good sources of food can be sand dunes, swamps, bush and suburban gardens. Many food plants also grow beside roads, especially highways that aren’t sprayed for weeds by council workers. There is an abundance of plants here because seeds have been spread by truck tyres and dust blowing from loads, and car travellers spreading all types of discarded food, mud and dirt.

You must be able to identify food plants, and the only way of doing this without direct instruction is to collect a small library of books that describe and provide pictures. Some books will even provide cooking instructions.

(1)
http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum ... 968964/pg1

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:33 am
Profile WWW
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:59 am
Posts: 6532
Location: Friendswood, TX
Post Re: Preperations
I am soooo grateful and thankful that I am fat!!!!

After reading recall's posts above I think I'm gonna die in survivalist mode!!!! Seriously!

Quote:
Get a packet of cheesy macaroni from Adli. (86 cents) Cook as per directions and add a tin of No-Name mussels from Woolworths (88 cents on special.)

:shock:

Are you kidding me? WHO eats like this? Maybe it's just an Aussie thing - I don't know but the very THOUGHT of mussels and mac n cheese - seriously, DUDE!?!

PUKE OH! And I don't CARE how hungry I am - I ain't eatin' THAT! :noway

Quote:
I got a sack of cauliflower pieces and carrot ends from *** at Wetherill Park in Sydney by walking around the back and helping myself to the waste bin.


:awe

Which ends of the carrots - the green end or the tip end? :shock:

Califlower pieces - you mean the ones they cut off with all the brown speckles on 'em? :huh

What ELSE is in this waste bin - fish? Meat? Old cigarette butts? EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

Quote:
food will be in dumpster bins


:noway :nono

Like I said - I'M GONNA DIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:(

_________________
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:42 pm
Profile
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
it's an exercise:

When nothing left :huh

The recipe of prepared Rat/Mice (1)
it tastes like chiken...
;)


(1)
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=322

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:27 pm
Profile WWW
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:59 am
Posts: 6532
Location: Friendswood, TX
Post Re: Preperations
Quote:
The recipe of prepared Rat/Mice (1)
it tastes like chiken..
.

:spit :nono :noway

Yeah - that's what my father told me when I ate barbecued rattlesnake the first time. :doh :roflmao

_________________
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:36 pm
Profile
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
The rattlesnake Taste like Fish!, but i like most the Aligator Smoke Meat ie:

Image
(1)
Quote:
Basic Alligator Jerky

Ingredients:

• alligator tail

• garlic salt

• black pepper

Directions:

1. Cut alligator tail into long strips, one inch wide and one-quarter inch thick or less.

2. Prepare the jerky salt mix by combining the equal parts of garlic salt and black pepper.

3. Sprinkle a thin layer of the jerky salt mix on a cutting board.

4. Lay alligator strips on salt mix.

5. Sprinkle a layer of salt mix on top of alligator, so both sides are completely salted.

6. Stick a toothpick through one end of each meat strip and suspend strips from oven or smoker rack after shaking off excess salt.

7. Heat or smoke around 120 degrees until dry (about four hours).

8. Store jerky in airtight containers or eat right away!


Another one:
Image
Cajun Style(1)
Quote:
Ingredients:

• 10 lb alligator meat

• 1/2 of a small bottle hot sauce

• 1/8 cup lemon juice

• 10 oz Worchestershire sauce

• 6 oz Soy sauce

• 1/8 cup Caynne pepper

• 1/2 small Bottle onion salt

• 1/2 small Bottle liquid smoke

Directions:

1. Mix ingredients.

2. Marinate 24-30 hrs.

3. Dehydrate in dehydrator


(1)
http://ezinearticles.com/?Alligator-Bee ... &id=532788

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Fri Jan 22, 2010 8:53 am
Profile WWW
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2009 6:06 am
Posts: 640
Location: Music of the Spheres
Post Re: Preparations
Bluebonnet, you've got this exactly right, and it's a serious point:

Bluebonnet wrote:
Are you kidding me? WHO eats like this? Maybe it's just an Aussie thing - I don't know but the very THOUGHT of mussels and mac n cheese - seriously, DUDE!?!

PUKE OH! And I don't CARE how hungry I am - I ain't eatin' THAT!



Inexperienced people growl "If yer hungry enough, you'll eat anything...." But that isn't what actually happens. "I'd rather starve than eat that...." is what happens. People will literally starve to death rather than eat unfamiliar foods.


This has happened over and over again when rescue foods have been shipped by the Red Cross, WHO or the military to famine stricken parts of the world - even though the food is high-calorie and perfectly safe, locals will refuse to use it because it is "strange" and "isn't real food" - i.e. wheat instead of their staple sorghum or rice instead of maize or barley, cow's milk instead of goat, etc. Humans are like that. When you're already freaked out, new foods just don't get tried. People under stress (especially children) WILL utterly refuse to eat something "strange" or that's not part of their normal diet rather than experiment with new foods under duress.

Which is why survivalists say: Store what you eat, and eat what you store.

All those folks who have tons of wheat and dried beans (that they never ordinarily eat) stashed away, but no coffee, salt, sugar, peanut butter or comfort foods, are in for a very rude surprise. (Especially if they've never actually baked anything that didn't come out of a Pillsbury mix box... :huh )

Personally, I am planning to live on chocolate for the duration. :brockoli

Cheers,

Selene


Sat Jan 23, 2010 2:53 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:59 am
Posts: 6532
Location: Friendswood, TX
Post Re: Preperations
Quote:
Personally, I am planning to live on chocolate for the duration


:roflmao

Me, too, Selene! Me, too! That is IF I can keep it in the storage long enough.

recall - cajun fried alligator is one of my all time favs! Never thought of making jerky out of it, though! :hmm

_________________
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Sat Jan 23, 2010 5:26 pm
Profile
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 2529
Location: Timeline 39, Earth-Moon L1 Lagrange point
Post Re: Preperations
Quote:
People will literally starve to death rather than eat unfamiliar foods.



That is the main point, there is a bit of time, right now, To start thinking of Alternatives...



Quote:
With no succulent leg of lamb, fluffy roast potatoes or chocolate bars in sight, Bear must put his prejudices aside and tuck into a whole array of 'tasty treats' in order to survive the most hostile places on earth.


more recipes:

Turtles (1)

Quote:
When you think of turtles, turtle soup comes to mind. If you want to save some time dressing the turtle, just get the meat out of the shell, bones and all. After the meat has boiled for a while, it is easy to separate the bones and gristle and break the meat up into smaller pieces. Turtle can also be breaded and pan-fried just like fish fillets, but it needs a little precooking first.

CAMP TURTLE SOUP

Ingredients:

Turtle meat from one turtle
1 large onion
Diced carrots, celery, and potatoes (enough to fill pot)
Beef or chicken bouillon cubes
Black pepper

Instructions:

Boil the turtle meat in the water with some of the beef or chicken bouillon until the meat can be removed from the bones. Do that, then add vegetables and cook until just done. Season with the pepper.

FRIED TURTLE

Ingredients:

1 turtle, cleaned and cut into large pieces
Flour seasoned with salt and pepper
Oil for frying
2 beaten eggs
2 pints milk
Dry bread crumbs or cracker meal

Instructions:

Parboil the turtle meat, separate it from the bones, and cut the meat into bite-sized pieces or larger. Coat it with the seasoned flour, dip it into the eggs, and coat it with the bread crumbs or cracker meal. Fry it in an inch or more of hot cooking oil. Break the meat up into smaller pieces.

(1)
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Foo ... spx?page=2

_________________
--
Remember: this whole thing is about self-responsibility, self-rule and self choice.
Überm Sternenzelt richtet Gott, wie wir gerichtet.


Sun Jan 24, 2010 11:16 am
Profile WWW
Truth Seeker

Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:22 pm
Posts: 46
Post Re: Preperations
Store what you eat, eat what you store!


Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:46 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore.