It is currently Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:10 pm



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
 Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm 
Author Message
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 8:54 am
Posts: 4865
Location: Canada
Post Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
Watch the video then we shall debate

http://www.wimp.com/unexplainedstructure/

Personally I believe we are MUCH older than we are lead to believe.

_________________
Image Please Obey the Golden Rules viewtopic.php?f=31&t=3563&p=40912#p40912


Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:33 pm
Profile WWW
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 11:21 am
Posts: 2748
Post Re: Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
Great find, L. Fascinating video. I do believe that there were earlier advanced civilizations, though how they disappeared, what disaster(s) caused the loss of their technology, I have no idea.

_________________
"A time comes when silence is betrayal." - Martin Luther King

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything." ~ Albert Einstein


Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:24 pm
Profile YIM
GT Truther
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:31 pm
Posts: 2633
Location: Bolton Point N.S.W. (AUS)
Post Re: Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
Yep bad that their tech looks better then ours how'd they get wiped out? that's the billion dollar question?

I suspect we are hybrids every one of us. Thing is I don't have proof.

_________________
I am a HIGHLY STRUNG PRIMA DONNA (atari)


Fri Sep 07, 2012 8:34 pm
Profile YIM
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:59 am
Posts: 6532
Location: Friendswood, TX
Post Re: Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
Did some googling on this yesterday after watching this fascinating video.

See below:

Gobleki Tepe and the Garden of Eden

Quote:
No traces of domesticated plants or animals have been found at Göbekli Tepe or in the adjacent region. Earliest proto-agricultural experiments are known from Upper Mesopotamia c.9500-10,000 B.C. and even earlier at 13,000 B.C. on the banks of the Upper Nile. A wild ancestor of domestic wheat has been found on a mountain only 20 miles away from Göbekli Tepe. Was wheat first domesticated in this region – an activity that promoted village life and population concentration from which a workforce for the hilltop sanctuary could be recruited? Earliest human activity at Göbekli Tepe may go back to 11,000 B.C., and the period of time when the megalithic stone circles were used is much earlier than evidence for the first agriculture in the region.

Ideas that Göbekli Tepe and the surrounding region is the historical reality behind the biblical Garden of Eden may not be as far fetched as they first seem. Archeology in Syria and Turkey has established that the region later known as the 'fertile crescent' was very lush immediately after the last Ice Age ended. The environment was exceptionally rich, herds of wild animals were huge, and plants and food were easily obtained. Gazelle herds might number 100,000, and permanent settlements were erected by 12,000 B.C. by nomadic hunters to store dried meat.

English archeoastronomy researcher Andrew Collins identifies Eden as a large region encompassing Upper Mesopotamia (Southeast Turkey, Northern Syria and Northern Iraq). He believes that the Biblical Garden of Eden in the Old Testament is a transformed memory that persisted throughout the ancient cultures of Mesopotamia. This memory of the extremely lush environment of this region of the fertile crescent immediately after the Upper Paleolithic ended and the glaciers retreated north may have been deliberately and carefully preserved by the priesthoods of Sumer, Egypt, Bablyon and Assyria. This 'legend' became the Garden of Eden in the Christian Old Testament.


Read more at http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/offbeat-news/mystery-deliberate-burial-ancient-megalithic-stone-circles/9949?image=3#r0wUjJ8AICc0JSiA.99

The other fascinating thing I found is that the whole complex has been built and buried three times! However, with each subsequent rebuilding, the artwork and stone themselves become more and more crudely built.

Do I think aliens built this. No. I think we don't give these people enough credit for being as smart then as we are today.

Homo sapiens has survived because we are adaptable and smart.

_________________
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:37 am
Profile
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 6:55 am
Posts: 3326
Location: 30 clicks N of 3030
Post Re: Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
Completely in alignment with the pre-history as this planet has been upgraded seven times with external intervention.

Interesting times indeed and the Holy See cannot contain the real Truth anymore, even though they try their damnedest!

:hmm

_________________
We all have the choice to exercise Free Will.
Omnia Vincit Veritas
"Ignis natura Renovatur Integram"


Sun Sep 09, 2012 5:33 am
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:59 am
Posts: 6532
Location: Friendswood, TX
Post Re: Things that make you go hmmmmmmmmm
snip

Who were the Denisovans?
Unfortunately, the Denisovan genome doesn't provide many more clues about what this hominin looked like than a pinky bone does. The researchers will only conclude that Denisovans likely had dark skin. They also note that there are alleles "consistent" with those known to call for brown hair and brown eyes. Other than that, they cannot say.

Yet the new genetic analysis does support the hypothesis that Neandertals and Denisovans were more closely related to one another than either was to modern humans. The analysis suggests that the modern human line diverged from what would become the Denisovan line as long as 700,000 years ago—but possibly as recently as 170,000 years ago.

Denisovans also interbred with ancient modern humans, according to Pääbo and his team. Even though the sole fossil specimen was found in the mountains of Siberia, contemporary humans from Melanesia (a region in the South Pacific) seem to be the most likely to harbor Denisovan DNA. The researchers estimate that some 6 percent of contemporary Papuans' genomes come from Denisovans. Australian aborigines and those from Southeast Asian islands also have traces of Denisovan DNA. This suggests that the two groups might have crossed paths in central Asia and then the modern humans continued on to colonize the islands of Oceania.

Yet contemporary residents of mainland Asia do not seem to posses Denisovian traces in their DNA, a "very curious" fact, Hawks says. "We're looking at a very interesting population scenario"—one that does not jibe entirely with what we thought we knew about how waves modern human populations migrated into and through Asia and out to Oceania's islands. This new genetic evidence might indicate that perhaps an early wave of humans moved through Asia, mixed with Denisovans and then relocated to the islands—to be replaced in Asia by later waves of human migrants from Africa. "It's not totally obvious that that works really well with what we know about the diversity of Asians and Australians," Hawks says. But further genetic analysis and study should help to clarify these early migrations.

snip

The new research reveals that the Denisovans had low genetic diversity—just 26 to 33 percent of the genetic diversity of contemporary European or Asian populations. And for the Denisovans, the population on the whole seems to have been very small for hundreds of thousands of years, with relatively little genetic diversity throughout their history.

Curiously, the researchers noted in their paper, the Denisovan population shows "a drastic decline in size at the time when the modern human population began to expand."

Why were modern humans so successful whereas Denisovans (and Neandertals) went extinct? Pääbo and his co-authors could not resist looking into the genetic factors that might be at work. Some of the key differences, they note, center around brain development and synaptic connectivity. "It makes sense that what pops up is connectivity in the brain," Pääbo noted. Neandertals had a similar brain size–to-body ratio as we do, so rather than cranial capacity, it might have been underlying neurological differences that could explain why we flourished while they died out, he said.

snip

Read more here: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=denisovan-genome

The above article is very interesting. We didn't even know about these people until 2010.

How many others do we not know about?

The archeological record is very slim and hit or miss at best. The information referenced above comes from one small bone in the finger and two teeth.

Imagine...

We don't know and, most likely, cannot even conceive of the diversity of humans that might have existed at one time in our distant past.

How did they survive? What were their communities like? We simply don't know.

What skills did they possess that we do not? Again, we simply don't know.

Imagine...

_________________
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Sun Sep 09, 2012 7:29 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore.