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 Pope Francis 
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Bluebonnet wrote:
Freak - maybe these women have simply had enough of men trying to force their agendas on women's bodies.


What they did is still uncalled for, Since when have men Forced their agenda's on women's bodies? If anything Women have forced their agendas on their own bodies I need examples please! actual examples! Do you have any? I have never forced women to do anything they simply can not do I have of course given my sister some negative encouragement simply to "get off your own A$$ and get your drinking cup yourself" because she's incredibly lazy but that's about it. It hurts me that common men Men with NO POWER cop the abuse when it's the men at the top do the abusing! the Men at the top are the Banking families they are the ones Making this happen!

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Wed Mar 26, 2014 7:16 pm
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Post Re: Pope Francis
I'm buying a few games today to support the

American Red Cross

or

Childs Play Charity

or

Electronics Frontier Foundation

or

World Land Trust

or

Charity: Water

I like Charity: Water but I love helping children too It really is difficult to decide!

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Wed Mar 26, 2014 7:29 pm
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Argument Over Pope Francis' 'Inequality' Tweet Misses the Point

by Wes Granberg-Michaelson 04-30-2014 | 10:15am

The latest dust-up about the unscripted words of Pope Francis came this week when he tweeted, in Latin, “Inequality is the root of social evil.” Conservative Catholics had their underwear in a bundle, nervously tweeting away about the dangers of addressing complex issues on Twitter, and warning about thinking that “redistribution” would solve global inequities. Some feared this was giving Thomas Piketty’s new popular book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, more press. Liberal Catholics were delightfully surprised, once again, and argued that the pope was doing nothing more than putting Catholic social teaching into a tweet.

But this latest interchange, happening of course between Catholics in the global “North,” misses the real point. Pope Francis’ tweet is another example of how we are hearing the voice, and seeing the actions, of world Christianity from the global “South.”

It’s nearly impossible to underestimate, in my view, the stunning historical significance of the College of Cardinals’ action. Until their selection of Pope Francis, Europeans had served as popes since the year 741. In 1900, two-thirds of the Catholic Church was found in Europe and the United States. A century later, two-thirds of Catholics are found in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, reflecting overall the most historic and dramatic geographic shift in the presence world Christianity ever to have happened in so short a period. Yet, the centers of administrative power, resources, and capital — both financial and theological — have remained in the control of Christianity’s shrinking minority in the global North.

Before the College of Cardinals selected Pope Francis, I wrote this (at Religion News Service and God’s Politics’ Blog):


One act by the College of Cardinals meeting in the Sistine Chapel can create a dramatic, symbolic, and yet powerful change in this present dissonant reality — namely, electing a pope from the Global South.

That single step would alter public perceptions and private expectations toward the spiritual leadership of half the world’s Christians, bringing fresh life, inspiration, and vitality to the Catholic Church, and serving as a model to the wider Christian community.

That’s exactly what we now see happening. And this isn’t just about the Catholic Church. It’s about the global perception of world Christianity.

Viewing Pope Francis only as a Jesuit who took the name, and model, of St. Francis upon his election, and is trying to revitalize the Catholic Church, misses the most important story. Pope Francis is giving a voice, and a model, of the witness of world Christianity in the Global South. That’s where the future shape of Christianity is being forged, and Pope Francis gives us some glimpses of what this looks like.

I’ve been with evangelical Christian leaders in Ghana, who in one breath testify to the saving power of Christ, and in the next breath condemn the unjust global economic structures and powers of the world that preserve economic inequality. Recognizing that massive income inequality is a sinful reality, creating suffering and inflicting evil, is a common, obvious assumption among Christians across the ecumenical spectrum who simply view the world through the eyes of the Global South.

Similarly, when Pope Francis suggests that we spend “too much time” focusing on issues like homosexuality or abortion, he’s not attempting to radically change Catholic doctrine. But he is expressing common sentiments among Christians whose ministry is rooted among people living on the margins, facing daily struggles for the dignity of life in the present.

Likewise, Pope Francis’ gestures of simplicity and humility — where he lives, what kind of car he rides in, and whose feet he washes — demonstrate that kind of integrity and example that simply makes sense to the vast majority of Christians living in the Global South. The latest rumor I’ve heard from Catholic friends is that Pope Francis would like to sell Castel Gandolfo, the luxurious summer residence of popes. If he did, who would be upset? Mostly hierarchs in the present power structure, dominated by those from Europe and the U.S. Catholics and non-Catholics alike from the Global South would cheer.

So I’d suggest that Protestants — evangelicals, Pentecostal, and mainline Protestants — look to Pope Francis not simply as a dramatic and hopeful change in leadership for the Catholic Church. Rather, look and listen to this unique, modern, fresh Christian leader to emerge from the Global South, and see some signs of what the global shift in world Christianity means for all of our future.

http://sojo.net/blogs/2014/04/30/argument-over-pope-francis-inequality-tweet-misses-point

I think this is an interesting article about Pope Francis. As a Protestant, it clarifies for me who/what this Pope is all about. I believe it also touches on the shifting demographics not only within the Catholic church but in the US as well.

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Wed Apr 30, 2014 8:15 am
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Post Re: Pope Francis
[quote="Bluebonnet"...
“Inequality is the root of social evil.”
....[/quote]

+1

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Wed Apr 30, 2014 8:48 pm
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Thanks, mountain! :heart

Even more amazing:

Quote:
Vatican to debate teachings on divorce, birth control, gay unions

Henry Chu

April 30, 2014, 5:00 a.m.

Reporting from Vatican City—

Contraception, cohabitation, divorce, remarriage and same-sex unions: They're issues that pain and puzzle Roman Catholics who want to be true to both their church and themselves.

Now those issues are about to be put up for debate by their leader, a man who appears determined to push boundaries and effect change.

On Pope Francis' orders, the Vatican will convene an urgent meeting of senior clerics this fall to reexamine church teachings that touch the most intimate aspects of people's lives. Billed as an "extraordinary" assembly of bishops, the gathering could herald a new approach by the church to the sensitive topics.

The run-up to the synod has been extraordinary in itself, a departure from usual practice that some say is a mark of the pope's radical new leadership style, and a canny tactic to defuse dissent over potential reforms.

Within a few months of his election last year, Francis directed every diocese in the world to survey local attitudes on family and relationships and report back to the Vatican, a canvassing of a sort that few of the faithful can recall previously. The results are being tallied and synthesized behind the walls of the Vatican.

The exercise reflects Francis' desire for less centralized and more responsive decision-making, mirroring his own self-described evolution from a rigid, authoritarian leader as a young man into one who consults and empathizes. His training as a Jesuit has taught the pope to cast as wide a net for information as possible, analysts say.

Taking the public temperature also brings tactical advantages. Nobody at the Vatican will be surprised to learn that vast numbers of Catholics disobey its ban on premarital sex and birth control, or that some are in gay partnerships. Setting down those realities irrefutably on paper, however, could strengthen a bid by Francis to soften the church's official line and put pressure on bishops inclined to resist, including some in the United States and many in Asia and Africa, conservative areas where the church has been growing.

"It is telling the pope and the Vatican what they already know. But it's what the Vatican in the past has not wanted to hear," author and Vatican expert John Thavis said.

"It's strategic, but it's also a genuine effort to find out what the voice of the church really is on this," Thavis said. "It's very much Pope Francis who wants less of a top-down model — the bishops preaching the rules and doctrine down to the faithful — and more of a dialogue."


snip

Read more here: http://www.latimes.com/world/europe/la-fg-vatican-family-20140430,0,1501699,full.story#axzz30NRBffdt

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The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Thu May 01, 2014 7:47 am
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Thanks, BLue, for keeping up with this thread - lots of good news coming out of the Vatican these days, and yes, I agree with the article that says Pope Francis is bringing the Southern mentality of church, specifically the Latino mentality, to the Vatican.

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Fri May 09, 2014 9:56 am
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Thank you, Ruts. Francis fascinates me and I think it is because I spent so much time in South America. I see where he is coming from.

He has now raised a firestorm among Conservatives.

Quote:
Pope Francis urges governments to redistribute wealth to the poor — maybe even half of it
By Travis Gettys
Friday, May 9, 2014 11:32 EDT

Pope Francis called on “legitimate redistribution” of wealth by the world’s governments to undo the “economy of exclusion” underlying capitalist society.

The pontiff appealed Friday to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the heads of major U.N. agencies in Rome, warning that wealth inequality promoted a “culture of death” at odds with Catholic teachings.

“An awareness of the dignity of each of our brothers and sisters whose life is sacred and inviolable from conception to natural death must lead us to share with complete freedom the goods which God’s providence has placed in our hands,” Pope Francis said.

These may be “material goods but also intellectual and spiritual ones,” Francis said, and he urged the world’s people “to give back generously and lavishly whatever we may have earlier unjustly refused to others.”

The Catholic Church’s first Latin American pope has upset American conservatives with his critiques of the unrestrained free market and “trickle-down” economics, which he dismissed as naïve and unsupported by the facts.

“A contribution to this equitable development will also be made both by international activity aimed at the integral human development of all the world’s peoples and by the legitimate redistribution of economic benefits by the State, as well as indispensable cooperation between the private sector and civil society,” Pope Francis said.


snip

Read more here: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/05/09/pope-francis-urges-governments-to-redistribute-wealth-to-the-poor-maybe-even-half-of-it/

He has now fussed up Glenn Beck, Rush Limbaugh and Fox News. :yamon :crylaugh

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The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Sat May 10, 2014 7:39 am
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Post Re: Pope Francis
Pope Francis Shares Top 10 Secrets To Happiness
The Huffington Post | By Antonia Blumberg
07/30/2014 7:12 am EDT Updated: 08/01/2014 12:59 pm EDT

Pope Francis spoke with Argentinian weekly “Viva” to commemorate the anniversary of his early pontificate, and in the interview he offered several tips for finding one of life's most elusive and desired treasures: happiness.

Speaking with interviewer Pablo Calvo, a longtime acquaintance of his, Pope Francis identified 10 tips for finding happiness that involve both personal and community development. His tips might not reflect a simple recipe for personal growth, but they offer insight into some of the pope's own values.

1. Let everyone be themselves. “The Romans have a saying, which can be taken as a point of reference,” Pope Francis said. “They say: Campa e lascia campà (Live and let live). That’s the first step to peace and happiness.”

2. Give yourself tirelessly to others. “If one gets tired, one runs the risk of being egoistic, and stagnant water is the first to be corrupted.”

3. Walk softly.

"In 'Don Segundo Sombra' there is a very beautiful thing, a man who looks back on his life. He says that in youth he was a rocky stream that carried everything ahead; As an adult, he was a running river, and that in old age, he felt movement, but it was "remansado" [dammed; slowed]. I would use this image of the poet and novelist Ricardo Güiraldes, the last adjective “remansado”. The ability to move with kindness and humility, calmness of life."

4. Be available to your kids and family. "Consumerism has led to the anxiety of losing," the pope said, which has pushed people to spend less time at home and more time pursuing wealth. But Pope Francis said people should invest more time in "healthy leisure":

“It is hard. The parents go to work and come back when the children are asleep. [But] it must be done.”

5. Spend Sundays (or a day of rest) with family. This connects back to the fourth point -- make the intention to set time aside for loved ones, despite the pressures of work.

6. Work toward empowering young people. The pope discussed the need to find creative ways to help young people secure employment so that they may feel the “dignity of bringing home the bacon.”

7. Care for the environment. For this Pope Francis echoed his earlier remarks that we must protect God's "special gift" of Creation.

8. Move on. Pope Francis encouraged finding ways to more quickly more forward after negative experiences. Forgiveness is key for this, as is having the willingness to let the next moment be better than the last.

9. Respect others' opinions. This ties back to the first point. We won't agree with everyone's beliefs or lifestyles, but that does not inherently make them any less valid.

10. Actively strive for peace.

“War destroys. And we must cry out for peace. Peace sometimes gives the idea of stillness, but it is never stillness. It is always an active peace. I think that everyone must be committed in the matter of peace, to do everything that they can, what I can do from here. Peace is the language we must speak."



Can you get behind a Pope Francis-style happiness?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/30/pope-happiness_n_5631792.html

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The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. - FDR


Sun Aug 03, 2014 2:40 pm
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